Home » Aging, Fatigue and Brain Injury: Living with Head (Brain) Injury (My Story and An Open Book) by Craig Lock
Aging, Fatigue and Brain Injury: Living with Head (Brain) Injury (My Story and An Open Book) Craig Lock

Aging, Fatigue and Brain Injury: Living with Head (Brain) Injury (My Story and An Open Book)

Craig Lock

Published February 2nd 2015
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
85 pages
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 About the Book 

TBI is a much more manageable injury today than it has been in the past, but it remains a major health problem. As people with TBI continue to live longer and face the challenges of aging with TBI, it will be our duty to provide better education andMoreTBI is a much more manageable injury today than it has been in the past, but it remains a major health problem. As people with TBI continue to live longer and face the challenges of aging with TBI, it will be our duty to provide better education and long-term programs and services. We all have brains- let’s continue to use them — injured or not — to support TBI prevention, research, and treatment.”Michael Paul Mason,Michael Paul Mason is the founding editor of This Land, a monthly magazine based in Tulsa. Mason’s first book, Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath, is an exploration into the harsh realities endured by people with brain injury.About the Submitter (Author)At age 15 I was in a serious accident in Cape Town, South Africa and was in a coma, unconscious or semi-conscious for between 3 weeks and 6 weeks, I think.. Since then have suffered from severe and chronic fatigue, which has shaped much of my life. (My dear X (a “very down to earth and practical” nurse”) says “Ive been sleep-walking through life”). Now after turning 65 the other day (and being really tired most of the time) , thought I’d write about aging and fatigue following TBI, based on my experience and hope this “info” may be helpful to others, patients, family and carers “out there”.*Its now nearly fifty years since that eventful day that changed my life. At that time little was known about brain injury and concussion. The fact that I survived after a serious closed head injury and am writing this is amazing in itself. My wife (who once worked as an intensive care nurse in London, said in those days not many people survived...and the reason that I did was because of my youth and fitness (at the time)My racing dream may have died that day, but Im still chasing new dreams, new horizons in my little life..Nevertheless, I have daily and ongoing difficulties trying to manage my life. Specifically in the areas of chronic fatigue doing two things at one (multi-tasking, like cooking (see Frank Spencer in the English comedy series Some Mothers Do Ave Em), walking and talking at the same time, getting muddled, etc. Although being highly driven , single-minded and focussed (sorry M and the boys) and highly motivated in my writing and part-time job (very), selling TV subscriptions here in Sleepy Hollow .Nevertheless my cognitive energy levels are very low (but have been ever since age 15). However, I get a burst of energy first thing in the morning after a good nights rest recharging my low battery. Then I work furiously for 2-3 hours writing, putting up articles on the net, then cruise/snooze through the rest of the day. (As dear M (or Betty), my wife said, You sleep-walk through life. Then go to bed early, and then to sleep between 9 and 9.30 pm exhausted. No late nights galavanting and dancing on tables at the night-spots of Sleepy Hollow (the slow pace of provincial New Zealand suits your author perfectly). How I/we got here is yet another story and is in some of my other books, like My Story, An Open Book (1,2 and3 and ‘Who Wants to be Normal Anyway) all available at Amazon. (Plug, plug, glug, glug!)https://craigswritingjourney.wordpres...http://inspiringvideo.wordpress.com/2...https://awritersdreams.wordpress.