Home » History of the Forest of Rossendale, with a Chapter on the Geology of Rossendale by Capt. Aitken, and Observations on the Botany of the by Thomas Newbigging
History of the Forest of Rossendale, with a Chapter on the Geology of Rossendale Capt. Aitken, and Observations on the Botany of the by Thomas Newbigging

History of the Forest of Rossendale, with a Chapter on the Geology of Rossendale

Capt. Aitken, and Observations on the Botany of the by Thomas Newbigging

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ISBN : 9781150036330
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274 pages
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Title: History of the Forest of Rossendale, With a Chapter on the Geology of Rossendale by Capt. Aitken, and Observations on the Botany of the District, by A. Stansfield General Books publication date: 2009 Original publication date: 1868 Notes: ThisMoreTitle: History of the Forest of Rossendale, With a Chapter on the Geology of Rossendale by Capt. Aitken, and Observations on the Botany of the District, by A. Stansfield General Books publication date: 2009 Original publication date: 1868 Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of the original. It has no illustrations and there may be typos or missing text. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. Excerpt: CHAPTER II. Hu forth my sword Ho I up my men My standard s folds nprear- Look m4 my ancient enemies, The ocean-thieves, are here. -- Charlemagne And Thk Sea-kixgs. Here, Athelstan, King -- of earls the lord, of barons the bracelet-giver -- and eke his brother Edmund the Etheling, won life-long glory in battle, with edges of swords, near Brunanburh. ..... Carnage greater has not been in this island, of people slain. -- Siijcoh Ode on the Battle o Bru, ititibnrh. MENTION was made in the previous chapter of the earthwork called the Dyke or Dykes, situated on the land belonging to the executors of the late John Lord, Esq., and John Whitaker, Esq., J. P., respectively, in the neighbourhood of Broadclough, Bacup. This singular monument of a bygone age is well worthy of a visit. By a slight exercise of the imagination the spectator may cause to pass before his mental vision the scenes long since enacted in its vicinity, and associate in spirit with the sturdy Danish warriors who in all probability manned and defended the intrenchment. Rossendale is not rich in relics- but for extent and importance the Dykes at Broadclough eclipse a multitude of lesser archaeological remains to be found in other localities. This work is described by Dr Whitaker, the historian, as an intrenchment to which no tradition is annexed that may serve to ascertain either its antiquity, or the end it was designed to answer. It is cut out from...